Author - David S. Sobel MD

David S. Sobel, M.D., M.P.H., is director of Patient Education and Health Promotion for The Permanente Medical Group and Kaiser Permanente’s Northern California Region. He practices adult primary care medicine at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Offices in San Jose. He also served as physician lead for Patient-Centered Care for the Care Management Institute of Kaiser Permanente. David’s research and teaching interests include medical self-care, patient education, preventive medicine, behavioral medicine, and psychosocial factors in health. He is coauthor of seven books including: Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions, The Healing Brain, Healthy Pleasures, and Mind & Body Health Handbook. He also served as an invited delegate to the World Health Organization (WHO) Congress that generated the Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion. He is the 2001 recipient of the national Healthtrac Foundation Health Education Award given to a health educator who has made a substantial contribution to advancing the field of health education or health promotion through research, program development, or program delivery. David is project director for two programs that won the James A Vohs Award for Quality: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Multi-Region winner in 2002 and The Self-Care/Healthwise Handbook Program runner-up in 1997. He is also a recipient of the TPMG Exceptional Contribution Award for 2005 for creating, developing, and disseminating health education programs that support Kaiser Permanente members throughout the continuum of care. David completed a bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University of Michigan. He then received his medical training at the University of California San Francisco with a medical internship at Presbyterian Hospital-Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. He also completed a master’s degree in Public Health and a residency program in General Preventive Medicine at the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley.

A Woman’s Work Is Never Done

More and more women work outside and inside the home. Do the double demands shouldered by working moms pose a threat to their physical health? In "A Woman's Work Is Never Done" David S. Sobel, M.D. sites evidence of the physiological impact of "role...

Friends in a park

Feed Friendships, Starve Colds

While it may make sense to limit your exposure to the viruses which trigger the sniffling, sneezing and coughing of the common cold, a recent study shows that, in fact, being around people - lots of different people - may be a key factor in being...

Reducing Stress Reduces Heart Disease

In "Reducing Stress Reduces Heart Disease" David S. Sobel, M.D. reports on a study of patients with heart disease where it was found that relaxation, taming hostility, and helping people change the way they look at life's challenges can reduce their...

Guided Imagery can speed surgical recovery

Guided Imagery Speeds Surgical Recovery

Patients undergoing surgery often experience a loss of control, feeling more like victims than participants. Anxiety, fear of the unknown, fear of pain, dependency, uncertainty, and helplessness are common emotions which can intensify the perception...

Man in a kid pool getting sprayed with water by his family and friends

Healthy Pleasures

Imagine the world without pleasure. Life would appear colorless and humorless. Human beings evolved to seek enjoyment to enhance survival. Yet, at nearly every turn pleasure has gotten a bad name. People are almost phobic about having fun. In...

Woman getting checked for heart disease

Hostility, Depression and Heart Disease

There is an accumulation of evidence that chronic hostility and chronic depression are major risk factors in heart disease. For many patients, it may be as important to learn and practice skills for managing these emotional states as it is to quit...

Patient communicating with his doctor

Tips for Communicating with Your Doctor

Patients often only communicate symptoms such as pain, wheezing, swelling, itching. Physicians often remain unaware of how the symptoms impact the patient?s life. Similar symptoms may have very different importance for different patients. It is...

Man screaming into his cell phone

Healthy Anger: Let It Out or Keep It In?

When it comes to health, the best thing is not to get angry in the first place. Once triggered, however, is it better to argue, shout, and bang your fists - or silently seethe? In "Healthy Anger: Let It Out or Keep It In?" David S. Sobel, M.D...

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