Author - David S. Sobel MD

David S. Sobel, M.D., M.P.H., is director of Patient Education and Health Promotion for The Permanente Medical Group and Kaiser Permanente’s Northern California Region. He practices adult primary care medicine at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Offices in San Jose. He also served as physician lead for Patient-Centered Care for the Care Management Institute of Kaiser Permanente. David’s research and teaching interests include medical self-care, patient education, preventive medicine, behavioral medicine, and psychosocial factors in health. He is coauthor of seven books including: Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions, The Healing Brain, Healthy Pleasures, and Mind & Body Health Handbook. He also served as an invited delegate to the World Health Organization (WHO) Congress that generated the Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion. He is the 2001 recipient of the national Healthtrac Foundation Health Education Award given to a health educator who has made a substantial contribution to advancing the field of health education or health promotion through research, program development, or program delivery. David is project director for two programs that won the James A Vohs Award for Quality: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Multi-Region winner in 2002 and The Self-Care/Healthwise Handbook Program runner-up in 1997. He is also a recipient of the TPMG Exceptional Contribution Award for 2005 for creating, developing, and disseminating health education programs that support Kaiser Permanente members throughout the continuum of care. David completed a bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University of Michigan. He then received his medical training at the University of California San Francisco with a medical internship at Presbyterian Hospital-Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. He also completed a master’s degree in Public Health and a residency program in General Preventive Medicine at the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley.

Here’s to Your Heart

Can one or two drinks a day actually be beneficial? In "Here's to Your Heart" David S. Sobel, M.D. outlines the apparent correlation of moderate drinking and a reduction of mortality from heart disease by about a third. Though even moderate alcohol...

Computers: New Prescription for Patients

By definition, "crisis" means that one's life is out of control. When faced with a health crisis, many people experience the information they receive about their condition -- and the way they receive it -- as making their feelings of being out of...

The Keys to Healthy Aging

Today, most people don't just want to live long lives. They want to live long healthy lives, or as the old adage puts it, "to die younger, as old as possible. Most of us want to add life to years, not just years to life. We all know people who have...

Overwhelmed woman at her computer

Rx: Halting Time Pressure

For many of us, the frantic pace is self-inflicted; we are too busy because we choose to be so. Being busy may be a sign of importance or self-worth. Some people are "rushaholics," depending on hectic activity to get going in much the same way...

Healthy Pleasures

Imagine the world without pleasure. Life would appear colorless and humorless. A baby's smile would go unappreciated. Foods would be tasteless. The beauty of a Bach concerto would fall on deaf ears. Feelings like joy, thrills, delights, ecstasy...

Sex May Prolong Life

When it comes to medical research on sex, most of the attention is on sexually transmitted disease and sexual dysfunction - Syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV/AIDS, impotence and frigidity. From this point of view, having sex is a grim and risky...

The Keys to Healthy Aging

Today, most people don't just want to live long lives. They want to live long healthy lives, or as the old adage puts it, "to die younger, as old as possible." Most of us want to add life to years, not just years to life. We all know people who have...

Exercise Improves Sleep

Findings from a recent Stanford University Medical School study may come as no surprise: older and middle-age people reported sleeping better when they added regular exercise to their routine. After 16 weeks in a moderate intensity exercise program...

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