Tag - aromatherapy oils

Bergamot

The small green fruit produced by this Mediterranean citrus tree aren’t edible or pretty, but the smell they emit is wonderful! Unfortunately, you must live in a warm climate like California to grow them. First mentioned in the 17th century En...

Birch

Birch

This North American tree is the common source of Wintergreen oil, with which it shares similar chemistry, properties and fragrance. The formula for the popular 19th-century “Russian Leather” men’s fragrance (so named because it...

Calendula officinalis

Calendula

The oil is costly and almost never available commercially, so we plant the colorful flowers in our gardens and infuse them into an herbal oil to use as a base for essential oils. Since two different flowers are called marigold, calendula is often...

Carrot Seed

Carrot-seed oil is distilled in France for use in perfumes. It comes from wild Queen Anne’s lace, the ancestor of carrot. The carrot oil used in cosmetics is usually carrot root extracted into vegetable oil. Marigold (Tagetes) is sometimes...

Caulophyllum Inophyllum

See the section on Carrier Oils in “Guidelines” chapter.
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Spikenard

Mentioned in the Bible in the Song of Solomon, spikenard was used by the ancient Egyptians and the Romans for nardinum ointment. Spikenard is the same heady oil lavishly poured over the feet of Christ by Mary Magdalene. It remains very expensive...

Cedarwood

This North American tree scents soap and cologne, although it has lost popularity since the 19th century, when even cedarwood “matches” were burned for their scent. The oil makes the wood resistant to wool moths and other insects...

Celery

Celery extensively flavors food, as well as alcoholic and soft drinks. It also scents soaps and some cosmetics. Family: Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) Extraction: Distilled from flower heads, celery’s scent is warm, spicy and sweet. The absolute is...

Matricaria recutita

Chamomile (German)

German chamomile oil contains green-blue chamazulene (azul means blue), a potent anti-inflammatory constituent produced during distillation. In 1664, when chamomile was first distilled in glass, the distillers were surprised to see the blue color...

Matricaria recutita

Chamomile (Roman)

This short-growing perennial produces very little chamazulene, so the resulting oil is pale yellow, not blue. It is a digestive stimulant and antispasmodic used for constipation and insomnia. Its applelike fragrance gives chamomile the Spanish name...

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