ASTHMA DRUGS::Bronchodilators double death risk in first 12 months

Asthma drugs have had a chequered past, going back to the early 1960s when the non-selective beta-agonist isoprenaline was withdrawn. Since then worries about the effects of other short-acting beta agonists have continued to be voiced, although the safety of the drugs has never been conclusively established.
A new study, from St George’s Hospital in London, suggests that the inhaled short-acting beta-agonists are most likely to kill within the first 12 months of use, and the risk recedes after that. In that crucial period the risk of death can double, and the most susceptible group seems to be those in the 45 to 64 years age group, although the researchers say there could also be other factors at play.

What Doctors Don't Tell You Written by What Doctors Don't Tell You

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