NEWS:HIP FRACTURES ARE LINKED TO SMOKING IN NEW STUDY

Among all women, one hip fracture in eight is attributable to smoking, regardless of body weight, early menopause and physical activity, according to a new meta-analysis.


The study showed that postmenopausal bone loss was greater in current smokers than in non-smokers. It concluded that smoking has a direct action on bone mineral density, decreasing it by an additional 2 per cent for every 10-year increase in age.


Compared to non-smokers, the relative risk of hip fracture was 17 per cent greater at age 60; 41 per cent greater at 70; 71 per cent at age 80; and 108 per cent greater by age 90.


Although the study concentrated on women, the authors note that analysis of studies relating to men suggest a similar decrease in bone density for them (BMJ, 1997; 315: 841-6).

What Doctors Don't Tell You Written by What Doctors Don't Tell You

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