Osgood-Schlatters disease

This is a condition where the bony protrusion below the knee becomes inflamed, causing swelling, pain and tenderness in young athletes. One reader wondered: Can anyone suggest a cure, as in many cases the condition appears to continue into adulthood? An osteopath wrote in to say that the affected area stops growing at about age 14 and if the sufferer continues to play sport while inflamed, it can become permanently enlarged. This can affect the mechanics of the knee in later life, but in most cases it is only a temporary problem. The key is to avoid sports while it is inflamed – usually about 6 months – but keep fitness up with other activities (swimming is good). Follow the RICE formula: rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Use the appropriate anti-inflammatories, such as topical NSAID gel, menthol gel, and homeopathic remedies. (One homeopath says to use Rhus tox 30c and ruta 30c, alternating daily.) Treatment by an osteopath would look at any imbalance in the low back, hip, knee, and ankle. Shock absorbing heel pads may reduce the load a little. Other remedies suggested by readers include ginger, boswellia, arnica, comfrey, turmeric, Cal carb (200c, 3 doses spread apart every 12 hours), glucosamine/chondroitin, and Omega-3 oils (fish, hemp, blackcurrant, and evening primrose). Aromatherapy oils and reflexology are beneficial too. Bromelin (available at Boots) and Cetyl Mobility (by Neways) were also recommended. One reader posits that the thyroid needs calcium – eat a whole food diet, cut out stimulants, get plenty of rest and supplement with vitamins B and C.

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What Doctors Don't Tell You Written by What Doctors Don't Tell You

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