Caraway

Carum carvi


Umbelliferae


Names:


Habitat: Native to Europe, Asia and North Africa, widely cultivated.


Collection: The flowering heads (umbels) are collected in July and left to ripen. The seeds are then easily collected as they can be shaken off.


Part Used: The seeds.


Constituents:

  • Volatile oil, consisting of carvone
    (40-60%) andlimonene, with dihydrocarvone, carveol, dihydrocarveol, pinen, thujone, and other minor constiruents

  • Flavonoids; mainly quercetin derivatives
  • Miscellaneous; polysaccharide, protein, fixed oil calcium oxalate.

Actions: Carminative, anti-spasmodic, expectorant, emmenagogue, galactogogue, astringent, anti-microbial.


Indications: Caraway is used as a calming herb to ease
flatulentdyspepsia and intestinal colic, especially in children. It will stimulate the appetite. Its astringency will help in the treatment ofdiarrhoea as well as in laryngitis as a gargle, It can be used in bronchitis and bronchial asthma. Its anti-spasmodic actions help in the relief of period pains. It has been used to increase milkflow in nursing mothers.


Combinations: For flatulence and colic Caraway combines well with Chamomile and Calamus, in diarrhoea with Agrimony and Bayberry and in bronchitis with White Horehound.


Preparations & Dosage: Infusion: pour a cup of boiling water onto l teaspoonful of freshly crushed seeds and leave to infuse for l0-l5 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day. Tincture: take l-4 ml of the tincture three times a day.


Go to Herbal Materia Medica Homepage

Connection error. Connection fail between instagram and your server. Please try again
David L. Hoffmann BSc Hons MNIMH Written by David L. Hoffmann BSc Hons MNIMH

Explore Wellness in 2021